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into white-collar fields. john: the first one if they do what a bunch of times, so what? >> the whole idea of a fair wage that basic value is threatened with the rise of unpaid labor. >> because they work for free they take jobs of those that would be paid. >> they have no trace of that is all that is out there. john: it sounds terrible. if they work for nothing it is abuse. >> i would like all of you to be paid but what is compensation? if you are these in turn for the stossel show that it help your career if you are in turn for rain news bureau john: you help people find internships. >> but i give tuesday night -- seven hours per week. >> they will not pay? >> but they are losing their own employees they don't have the money you very have the internal not pay them or not at all. john: i built my career on people like you. i do not think it was exploiting new. i needed research help and my employer laughed i would ask a college and i was surprised many were eager to, but afterwards they said i learned more from you than college and i didn't have to pay anything i had to pay tuition that r
times a requirement to break into white-collar fields. john: the first one if they do what a bunch of times, so what? >> the whole idea of a fair wage that basic value is threatened with the rise of unpaid labor. >> because they work for free they take jobs of those that would be paid. >> they have no trace of that is all that is out there. john: it sounds terrible. if they work for nothing it is abuse. >> i would like all of you to be paid but what is compensation? if you are these in turn for the stossel show that it help your career if you are in turn for rain news bureau john: you help people find internships. >> but i give tuesday night -- seven hours per week. >> they will not pay? >> but they are losing their own employees they don't have the money you very have the internal not pay them or not at all. john: i built my career on people like you. i do not think it was exploiting new. i needed research help and my employer laughed i would ask a college and i was surprised many were eager to, but afterwards they said i learned more from you than college and i didn't have to pay
a job but multiple times a requirement to break into white-collar fields. john: the first one if they do what a bunch of times, so what? >> the whole idea of a fair wage that basic value is threatened with the rise of unpaid labor. >> because they work for free they take jobs of those that would be paid. >> they have no trace of that is all that is out there. john: it sounds terrible. if they work for nothing it is abuse. >> i would like all of you to be paid but what is compensation? if you are these in turn for the stossel show that it help your career if you are in turn for rain news bureau john: you help people find internships. >> but i give tuesday night -- seven hours per week. >> they will not pay? >> but they are losing their own employees they don't have the money you very have the internal not pay them or not at all. john: i built my career on people like you. i do not think it was exploiting new. i needed research help and my employer laughed i would ask a college and i was surprised many were eager to, but afterwards they said i learned more from you than college and i didn'
a couple of seconds until john fugelsang and "viewpoint." we'll see you tomorrow. >> john: this weekend was the cpac convention which gathers together all the republicans who are never going to be president in one place. and one of the biggest panels of cpac was what to do when someone calls a racist during your incredibly racist c cpac event. >>> the steubenville sentencing happened today and some said guys turn it down a bit. and it's the 10th anniversary of the iraq. today is the birth date of rnc chair reince priebus. happy birthday chris fugalsang not related to me, and prime minister nevel chamberlain. it's not cool. i didn't want to include him on this list but my producer did so i'm appeasing him. this is "viewpoint." [ ♪ theme music ♪ ] >> john: i'm john fugelsang and this is "viewpoint." the republican obsession with slashing the marble debt no matter what the cost to the needy during a recession seems a little less obsessive today. true the ryan budget the g.o.p. house is sure to pass, would slash programs to eliminate the debt in just ten years. and the so-called sequest
will air tomorrow. i'm excited about that. john fugelsang back now with "viewpoint." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> john: good evening. mark sanford is headed for a run-off election for the congressional seat in south carolina. i want kate to see when he runs off for his other election. the president arrived and said shalom which many tea partyers in america say prove he was not born in america. >>> and children will be less educated about all that medicaid they're not receiving. happy birthday spike lee, mr. rogers and 97 years ago today albert einstein first published his theory of relatively and then had to spend the rest of his life saying yeah nice theory, einstein. this isel "viewpoint." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> john: good evening i'm john fugelsang and this is "viewpoint." thank you for joining us. if you thought that senate democrats were serious really serious about taking on the nra and passing major gun control legislation after the newtown school massacre, well, i hate to disappoint you but "the new york daily news" got it right with this devastating cover page. "shame on u-s on us, indeed. harr
to enter the challenge the impossible promotion >> john: the fact that american police tell little kids they don't have the proper permits to do this, made me wonder, what does it take to open a lemonade stand legally in america. >> they directed me to this website. >> this is supposed to make life simple. >> they make it easy, except, what? >> there was unintelligible questions. >> what is an assistant. >> an employee identification number. >> the government said i needed to take a 15hour protection class to sell lonade. >> i don't have a bicycle. >> and then an exam and wait weeks to find out if i passed. then i would buy a government approved fire extinguisher it could take months, forget it. so i did it without a permit. max's lawyer gave me the okay. i didn't sell anything. i had to give every refunds. first, the customers thought it was crazy. many once had their own lemonade stands. >> did you have to get a license? >> i'm in canada and i can't let you dri this. >> there are so many rules, i'm not allowed to sell this to you. >> i didn't have time to get all the permits. >> you d
. sunday virginia place st. john's in the nit the not invited tournament. take a moment now wish a very happy birthday to my friend, chenk uygur, who was introducing jimmy carter in atlanta. that will be on "the young turks." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> michael: the e.u. banned testing on animals and we're still trying to ban shooting on children. and john boehner thinks everyone should have background checks before buying a gun. and his office issued an immediate retraction. and bp has changed it's environmental record on wikipedia. it's shocking that something like this could happen on a website, but why do polluting corporations feel the need to rewrite history when we can do it for them. happy birthday to cenk uygur and jimmy carter boycott the olympics because of invasion of afghanistan. it was called the some day this will be ironic act of 1980. this is "viewpoint." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> john: good evening, i'm fug fug. this is "viewpoint." back when chicago mayor rahm emanuel was president president obama's chief of staff he told reporters, you never want a serious crisis to go to waste.
to 1987 and the journey of pope john paul ii to northern california. and we look at the other papal visits to the united states. >> i give you my best wishes. >> and we look at the lives of john paul ii and the career to date of pope benedict xvi. >>> good evening and welcome to a second look. pope john paul ii came to san francisco at the time that the city was at the grips of the aids epidemic. what the pope did helped to comfort those with aids. he reached out and touched them offering a blessing an hope of healing. we have a report from that day. beginning with rita williams who was at mission dolores with the pope's visit to the california's oldest mission. >> reporter: john paul ii warmly greeted those along the center aisle of the pope. some of the 900 invited guests. the pope then approached the nine pews of aids patients. and certainly the most moving moment came when 4-year-old brendan ororke reached out to hug the holy father. little brendan contracted aids from a blood transfusion at birth. the pope then moved to other aids sufferers, most of them gay. it was the first time the
they have viewed the monroe doctrine? >> i don't mean to, for years, there was people that suspected john quincy adams wrote it. elizabeth didn't write it. just about everybody else got credit for it. it's interesting. there is one point where he refers to her as his partner in all things. one senses, although, there is an unfortunate lack of documentation that that would include sharing his political secrets with her. i don't think of her, certainly in the modern sense as a political figure. she was certainly aware of what e was doing. we only have one letter that she wrote, but there are etters of her handwriting that she copied for him to either make copies to send to others or to keep. she was certainly aware of what was happening. they were together for so long and they were so close that it's inconceivable that they did not discuss public matters. she was certainly very much well aware of what was happening. >> and having lived through the french revolution, the reign of terror, she certainly would have had strong opinions about the approach to europe, you would imagine. >> yes. >>
-- do -- turkoglu.com we'll have another show for you. and "viewpoint" is next. john: wane lapierre called mayor bloomberg in said, which is like leonard cohen calling your songs depressing. the democrats passed a budget. the republicans think it's horrible and will like it less once they've read it. there's controversy about the today show airing the sandusky interview footage. they can blame it on ann curry. shades the birthday of the great aretha franklin and sir elton john and baseball hero lee mislewy. are years abjohnny cash recorded ring of fire. he said it was about the human heart. his wife said it was about a lower part of female fat me. this is "viewpoint." ♪ theme ♪ >> good evening i'm john fugelsang, this is "viewpoint." since the tag ban fled afghanistan in december, 2001, some horrible human rights abuses have taken place in prisons inside that country. nearly half the prisoners have said they were tortured and held in places with nicknames like the black jail and salt pit. the good news about the bad news? today, the u.s. government finally got out of the prison
a picture, an image of president roh. -- monroe. james madison gave three speeches. john -- thomas jefferson gave two. peach -- people never saw the president or heard the president. is not a public perception. it is a good question. but it is a different time. >> the white house was burned by the priggish -- the british and the matteson's had to leave while it was being constructed. the munros moved back in. how important was this symbolically? >> even by then, the white house had become america's house. itsof the reasons why occupants have been targeted often for criticism, much of it is fair, it is because it our house. would be criticized for an alleged obsession for fashion. -- she paido $1,500 up to $1,500. she painted her face, applying ruche. , itilly as it sounds now takes us back almost to a debate at the very beginning about what kind of nation this would be. >> it really reflects to this monroe administration, we will show you this clip next. clip] >> if i could go back to one time in the white house, i would probably go back to the monroe period. the united states began to come
. >> and, john allen, you're watching right along with us. these are some extraordinary events we're seeing. >> they are absolutely remarkable. you know, i can tell you, john and zoraida, based on the reporting i've been doing this week, i think pope francis has charmed the entire world except for one small constituency which are his security patrol who are quite frankly at witt's end what he's going to do next and how to keep him safe. obviously this is a pope who is determined to be as close to his people as possible, not to be walled off from them, and at a pastoral level, at a human level, that's a remarkably endearing quality, but for the people who are charged with his security, it also has got their blood pressure up. i think we're seeing additional indications this morning of how he's going to be somebody that they're going to have to sort of figure out a new script to make sure he can be as close to people as possible but at the same time not be putting himself in harm's way. >> john, i want to stay with you for a second here and talk about some of the dignitaries that will be atte
their business and through their personal lives. [applause] mark will be introducing john carlos. i'm also pleased to welcome kate damon here this evening. kate's business is called k's and it's a graphic design business but it's gotten involved in arranging for the speakers. in this case john lewis to be with us this evening and we are grateful to her. you might recognize her name. she grew up in charlottesville and her mother has something to do with this book festival. [applause] so first, mark. [applause] >> good evening everyone. thanks. thanks for those really nice introductory comments. well, if you haven't seen the picture photo i'm going to remind you of it. [applause] they say that a picture tells a thousand words and in the case of one at tonight's scheduled -- special guests it speaks to us in so many different levels. it's the 13-year-old sports night back in new jersey in 1968 i had several iconic sports photos on my bedroom walls and on my desk. willie mays, the catch, jackie robinson rounding third base screeching in his cleats in his brooklyn dodgers uniform on heading hom
b smith, tobin smith, jonas max ferris. and john, is this madness? lawmakers are fighting over what to cut, they're reallocating funds for all that pork. >> yeah, this shows exactly how bad of a character our lawmakers have in d.c. look, we have no energy plan. our education system drops in world rankings, we have no jobs plan. we have no plan. we don't even have a budget and yet, these guys are still filling things with pork to get reelected. if you're in private practice and you take money supposed to go to some project and you build a fence around your house, whether that fence is good, makes your house look better and whether your neighbors like it, it's stealing and that's exactly what these guys are doing, it's called pork and it's stealing and shows the character of our congress and it shows why our country is so screwed up. >> brenda: well, gary b, what about digging private wealth for private property owners? what's going on? >> well, i tell you what, brenda, on the one hand we have 85% of americans think there should be a balanced budget. it is in ourlood. i mean, every ho
john paul began the morning in monterey county where he led a mass for tens of thousands of workers. >> reporter: thousands were given the day off. agustin romo and his family would be getting ready to pick strawberries were it not for the court. >> we have a great seat. >> you have the best seats in the house probably. >> i think so. >> reporter: this group is from the polish mission church in san jose. >> i'm catholic and he's the pope. and i came here to see him. it doesn't matter for me he's polish or a different nationality. for me it's the pope. >> reporter: not too far away we find maria cortinas not the best seat but good enough. >> are you cold maria? >> poquito. >> how do you like the view you have here? >> it's beautiful. she likes it. >> reporter: a few hours later, cortina's view no longer exists. heavy fog rolls in and while the papal preliminary continues the pope is heard but not seen. but many say the pope will be felt. the weather still caused enough concern to cancel the pope's helicopter ride into laguna seca. the pope's
and abc television networks before starting her television career and next is john. i met john about 10 years ago when he was starting off and had this crazy idea of operating a training center for public defenders and he did. he's no now the president and founder and one of the contributors to gideon's army, he's from john marshall law school where he teaches law and criminal procedure. he was in the post katrina and new orleans center. he trained people in the film. he received an advocacy fellowship and named a public interest fellow by harvard law school. next we have maurice call well. he was convicted in the housing project here in san francisco. there was no physical evidence linking him to the crime yet he was still convicted based on the false testimony of a single neighbor. he was sentence to life behind bars. in prison mr. colwell contacted the center for help and located two witnesses who saw the murder and said mr. colwell was not involved in anyway. they located the real killer who confessed and he committed the murder. that man is serving a life sentence for a subsequen
. meredith whitney and john thain coming up on the second hour of "the closing bell." i'll see you tomorrow. >>> and it is 4:00 on wall street. do you know where your money is? hi, everybody. welcome back to "the closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo on the floor of new york stock exchange. stocks closed lower after a flare up in the eurozone debt crisis. take a look at how we're settling today on this monday afternoon on wall street. dow jones industrial average down 60 points. almost one-half of 1% lower. 14453 after a busy close on friday. nasdaq composite under selling pressure, down 11.5 points. it may be red across the board for major averages. hank smith points out if the cyprus bailout had happened last year, the dow would have likely shed 300 points on the open alone. this proves that the united states is clearly, as he puts it, the best house in a bad neighborhood. is that the right picture to paint? joining me right now along with hank is jason pride, peter schiff of euro pacific capital and our own bob pisani. peter schiff, let me kick it off with you and get your take on what's go
. they would stop for a drink and play polka, not polka, poker. and lynched to john gibbons play an accordion on his wooden leg. you had the sense of people having come over if not in mass by a great number to this other place with a kind of echo of that place being transposed into the world that became my world. so that of my mother's side of the family. my father's side was more mysterious. over time i heard stories of lost aunts and saint john >> new found land which is not where they are from and a deeper echo further back. i had my grandfather's passport from 1918, you could smell the must on it. all of the mysterious presences were there. my father's side was a mystery which we will get to eventually. and the third component is similar to what margaret was talking about. i irish american. i didn't know what a pure american was. none of my friends were pure americans. a lot of my friends were lebanese and from syria. i had yewish and irish american friends. all of our identities were mixed. my sense of being american was being in a mix of things. >> margaret could you also reflect in a
by assigning it an activity which is an expensive mess no matter who undertakes it. i would rather have john and steve use their powers of persuasion and libertarian instincts to apply to another need. privatize elementary schools. >> a subject for another conversation. we'll have that conversation. mike, by the way to clarify to, the tsa denied wrong doing with this marine. i wouldn't take their word or anybody's right now. >> my personal experience is all i can go by. when i have flown i've seen tsa be extremely inefficient. i remember going through check points and the magnetic scanners and then waiting at the boarding area after we all have gone through everything, three workers there one of them randomly would pick someone to check. the other two were standing there. >> sounds like one of these government work projects. >> i agree with mike it's inefficient. we have the tsa acting like bouncers at a bar, basically treating that marine or 95-year-old ladies like terrorists. the thing is when you privatize the people know that they have to treat customers with respect, not like they are p
in this country which is by far the fastest growing group in this country. >> to father john wauck in rome about this question of the ecumenical nature of this moment, the unity of christian churches, the idea there was one jesus, maybe there should be one church at the end of the day but father john wauck, as you see these delegations from the various christian churches especially the orthodox churches, how does it strike you? >> well, i think the different orthodox churches have different relationships with rome. some of them are actually quite close and sort of actively seeking union with rome. it's the greeks that have traditionally -- the greeks and russians who have been furthest from rome so the fact that bartholomew is here today really is a historic event. there was a brief moment of reunion actually in the 1400s. i mean it's not entirely true that there was a thousand years since the greeks and the orthodox -- eastern orthodox and roman church were in union but it was very short-lived because of the fall of constantinople to the turks shortly afterwards, in fact, reflected on the doors
encompass practically every denomination you can imagine, john. >> jim, you are in rome with the crowd starting to trickle in there. you have established that the pope has in a few days quite a connection with the italian people. >> i think so, yes. one of the things that has been i think quite attractive for a lot of people is the informality, his approach to people and the fact that he's been out in the crowds. of course, it's been a nightmare for the security people because they just don't know what to expect. we don't, in fact, know too much what to expect. we know the outline for the mass and we know how it basically will transpire according to the vatican, but there may be some ad lib moments. one of the things we're looking for, we haven't gotten quite yet from the vatican press office, the pope's remarks, the home homily. we've already been warned the pope might deviate and ad lib from there. we've got to do a little bit better job than reporting than perhaps the vatican press core has in the past. >> jim bittermann, we'll be back to you. everyone loves the hope who mixes it up
show tonight. >> and now, john stossel. >> i am in washington, d.c. for the biggest ever students for liberty conference more than a thousand students have come here to debate what the conditions needed for people to be free are and to prosper. one way some of these students prosper is by doing internships. most student now do them. how many of you have been interns? most. how many of you want to be? about all. how many of you do it or would do it for no pay? most everybody. i think that is a good thing. often internships are unpaid. one says it is is another says internships are great. hue ross, what's wrong with internships? it's a voluntary exchange. >> let's be clear we are not talking any more about a sing eliel short term training and getting a job at the end of it. talking about doing this after graduation talking about it becoming a requirement in order to break into a whole range of white collar fields. >> before we get to a requirement which is another matter, let's say they do it a bunch of times. so what? they volunteer. >> the whole idea of a full's age for a hard day
. that's not nice. john backus is a venture capitalist at new atlantic ventures in d.c. and we did reach out to oracle earlier today for a response on mr. ellison's travel schedule, but we've yet to hear back from the company. john fortt, fill us in on this story. >> well, i think ms. catz has a point here, but maybe the sales team wasn't thrown under the bus. i think they've been in a way under the bus for a while now. it's important to go back, back in june, the head of sales, keith block, left oracle. and one of the stories that i have heard today is i've kind of asked questions around this, is that oracle has still been transitioning the sales force, trying to go from selling mostly database to selling hardware and clad applications as well, and it kind of caught up to them. q4 is the time when the sales team really has to perform, if they're going to hit their annual quota. we really have to see if they show up in this case. i still think, though, they're going to have kinks to work out going forward because they're really trying to sell this suite of products in a whole different w
as they are greeting him. i want to go to john thavis in rome having covered the papalcy for 30 year. this is one of those changes that pope francis has made. in the past several day, what you've seen, what stands out, what do you make of this guy? >> one word, simplicity. we've just seen it here. the plan had -- the program was for all of the cardinals to come up and make this profession of obedience. i think he realized this is going prolong the service by about an hour and a half. the new pope is said to like shorter liturgies. that's why he also eliminated the offertory ceremony. he will not deliver communion. which surprised people. he does not want to make himself a attraction. getting in line for communion with the pope gave the people an idea they were privileged. this is a different style. like we have seen him adrop a different style in the way he greets people, the way he addresses crowds and the way he generally acts in front of the world. >> john, thanks very much. we want to let you know, the inaugural mass is about to begin now that the moments of symbolic inauguration of the papac
, thank you. i want to bring in our aviation expert, john nance, tonight. and john, when we heard this today, we couldn't believe it. instead of turning right down the aisle, he makes a left turn right into the cockpit. how does this happen? >> well, first of all, the cockpit door is very often open on the ground, before we start closing things up. so, that part is understandable. but what a -- i can't believe the guy thought he could get away with this. >> and, you know, this happened before the plane actually pushed back, so, what are the chances he could have pulled this off any longer here? >> the chances are pretty much absolute zero. and the reason is, the first thing we're going to do, any pilot is going to ask for the paperwork. there's got to be something from the company, there's got to be a good idea. he failed on both those counts. and even if those are good, you're still going to have an exchange as pilots and we're going to know within just a few seconds that this is not really a pilot. >> our aviation consultant, john nance, with us tonight. john, our thanks to you,
on something that john -- said about taxi stands. i think the sooner we get taxi stands back where they belong the better the taxi service is going to be in this city and to follow up on something that mr. -- [inaudible] said to come up with any decision they may not make any decisions regarding illegal limosines in my lifetime and i say that partly tongue and cheek because i hope i am wrong but i have never seen any action -- [inaudible] and you know the thing is i think one of the rulings that the state puc made was we're not going to fine you until we look into everything. apparently, take that to mean -- i think that they are operating illegally right now so i think you as the board have the authority to ask for that. >> thank you. >> joan wood, john horn. >> is there any other members of the public who wish to address the board if they can fill out a speaker card and bring that to me, it would be appreciated. thank you. >> mr. heal ye? >> good afternoon. now the mic is on. [laughter] i was reading the economist you are going to be holding a world cup coming up here and how are you g
-controlled house. for more on this we turn to cnbc's chief washington correspondent john harwood. john, how does all this play out? >> well, lester, look, they are going to fight. and they may not be able to reconcile these two documents. the house budget would balance after ten years. repeal obama care. no tax increases. the senate budget doesn't get to balance after ten years, it includes $1 trillion of tax increases, even some stimulus money to try to get the economy going. but it's significant that they're fighting at a lower level of intensity and turmoil. notice that the congress left for easter break without a crisis over a government shutdown. there was no crisis over potential debt limit, and government default earlier this year. could come back this summer but so long as it lasts, that's calming for the markets and good for the economy, and it may, lester, leave some space still for a compromise in which democrats would agree to changes in cuts in medicare and social security, and republicans would come up with a little bit more tax revenue, lester. >> all right, john harwood tonight,
the early years of her life with john quincy, they attend numerous types of churches, especially whoever the rotating preacher was in the capital during the secretary of state and presidency years could be presbyterian or unitarian. an ends up very much episcopal thinker, high church and is very, in her later years, she spends a lot of time reminiscing and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland, hi, nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our town centers, we have a plaque. and a book where you get an impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? >> that is louisa catherine's birth family. in marylan
. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm john berman. >> i'm christine romans. soledad has the day off today. our "starting point," two rockets land in israel during president obama's historic trip there. we're live in the west bank as the president is moechlts away now from a live news conference with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. we will bring that to you live. >>> manhunt happening for the person who gunned down the head of colorado's prison systems. police in desperate search for a car and a witness who may have some answers. >>> more rattling from north korea last night wit the threat that u.s. bases are within, quote, striking distance of their country. >>> and the heat just on fire. down by double digits late in the game. they rally to keep the winning streak alive. 24 games and counting. will it ever stop? >> wow! good morning. it's thursday, march 21st. "starting point" begins right now. >>> good morning again. our "starting point," president obama in the west bank with face-t face-t face-to-face with world leaders. the press conference is scheduled to start in a few minutes from
?iewrkz dexter filkins of the "new yorker," and john burbs of the "new york times." >>ke the numbers killed, iraqis, americans, very high numbers of wounded, the gicantic cost that weighs on me, and i'm not an american, every time i come tot the united states and think what $1 trillion or $two trillion could have done to alleviateve poverty, improve roadses improve hospitals in the united states. the conclusion i have come to, there was much about the american effort in iraq that i admired, wasam that it was missn impossible from the start. >> let's go back tom syria. here we have a humanitarian catastrophe. 70,000 dead,un, which is probably a low figure at this point. and we are largely sitting it out. we're largely watching from the sooipped linees.wa as this happens, and as the longer this war goes on, the bad effects of is that war are going to spread into jord, into iraq, as we've already seen, anv into lebanon, and we're justan watching. and i think we're just watching because of iraq.e we look at syria, and we see iraq. >> there is a quotation from ambassador crocker one of ou
: and the annual financial support of: hello, i'm john lithgow. welcome to "american cinema." in 1946, hollywood didn't think a tv screen only inches in size could ever compete with a theatre screen 30 feet wide. movies were king. television was a novelty developed by radio industry. barely 6,000 sets were in use across the entire country. by 1951, it was a new world and television was a part of it. movie theatres were closing in waves, 55 in new york alone. to make matters worse, hollywood was coming apart. anti-trust action dismantled the entire studio system. the monopoly of the movies was over. hollywood's reaction to tv was like one of its plot lines. at first denial, then feeling threatened, followed by fierce competition until embracing the adversary. yet it was television that produced a new generation of movie directors that told stories in new ways, with movies like "the manchurian candidate," "bonnie and clyde," and "mash." the studios didn't disappear; they adapted. and so did the movies. today, we are on the verge of another revolution, as a whole new range of digital technologies w
, the kind of thing they get done as a matter of course. under house speaker john boehner, not shutting down the government has become a notable achievement for this congress. mozzletop on that. a low bar. >>> house republicans also voted today again for the paul ryan budget. democrats are very excited about that because they plan to use that vote against republicans in campaign ads for the next election. we have the one and only ezra klein here momentarily to sort out what's important about what they just voted on in congress and whether we just avoided one of the cliff slash ceilings clash crisis congress now schedules for us every few weeks and whether the way they avoided this next one is itself important. there's a lot going on in the news. we have a lot ahead. we begin tonight with late breaking and rather surprising news from the democratic leader in the senate, senator harry reid. following two days of angry response from california senator dianne feinstein, she had been very publicly disappointed and angry harry reid was not going move her assault weapons ban to the senate floor as
. joining me now john rosenthal. john welcome back into "the war room." >> thank you. >> michael: isn't it ironic that wayne lapierre says bloomberg can't buy the american public? >> it sure is. the ben factors and the uniquely dominating gun industry has intimidated the democratic party and influenced the republican party. i go to a gun store. federally licensed gun dealers have to run a background check. but members of congress have agreed that criminals and terrorists who can't pass a background check should be able to legally buy guns in 33 states from private gun dealers. so they are supporting the rights of criminals, the mentally ill and even terrorists. it's time we stand up to the uniquely regulated gun industry and say no, you are not going to buy our government. >> michael: listening to you say that it's so damn frustrating, john, the nra it appears and i think you would agree -- does int seem like they are still winning at this? and if they are, have they at least been weakened by newtown at all? >> i think so with regard to the general population. but w
cousin john edwards volunteered for possession every week. he was certified. ex exor citizenim did nothing. colt 45, crazy horse they demand the sacrifices in blood so bottles would go to the couch friday night. walls kicked until straight jackets lay waiting on the lawn. mama would site visions of gang boys with metal vent as if it explained anything. it didn't between dusk from the and dawn saturday he was ready to blow the -- up. do you want some of this? oh , no, yes oh , no or yes , i will be damn, i will be damn, i will be damn. [applause] >> this is called someone else's child. and i guess it's a sort of an imagined conversation with a took place in a real moment in my father's hospital room in a matter of weeks before he died. my father is my foster father and there was always in my life this level of awkwardness because i was not biologically his own son. and he and i never got to have the conversation that i imagined here on page in this piece. so, there is a lot of truth in it. and here we go. someone else's child. >> i'm going to write a poem about you, i said. shall
resisting it. he was the commander at the time. john abazaid, the central command, which oversaw the middle east, was also not for it. secretary of state condi rice was very strongly opposed to it and i accessed a transcript of the meeting at the white house where she voiced her view. she simply thought the opportunity to change things through military force was gone. all of her deputies thought. o >> rose: but it also should beug pointed out, as you will do, the notion that it was the combination of the surge and the arab awakening.at the sunnis were beginning toke turn on al qaeda, and those two things converged.h >> well, bush made a decision, supported basically by his own n.s.c. team, general petraeus, who was in waiting but had not yet been officially picked, andy ray odyearno was the number two command or the ground, and jack keene, who had been former vice chief of staff, who had been working as interlock tour, going around and ashiewrpg the white house. i don't think when theyar made e decision the white house really anticipated that the surge would have this catalytic effect on th
from what we saw earlier. it reminds me an awful lot of john paul ii. people do much the same thing. >> can we listen in here a little bit? i think this is the second reading, now in spanish. >> translator: the promise of inheriting the world was not made to abraham and his descendants on account of any law. but on account of the righteousness which consists in faith. that is why what fulfills the promise depends on faith, so that it may be a free gift and be available to all of abraham's descendants. not only those who belong to the law. but also those who belong to the faith of abraham, who is the father of all of us. as scripture says, i have made you the ancestor of many nations. abraham is our father in the eyes of god. in whom he put his faith and who brings the dead to life and calls into being what does not exist. though it seemed abraham's hope could not be fulfilled, he hoped and he believed. and through doing so, he did become the father of many nations, exactly as he had been promised. your descendants will be as many as the stars. this is the faith that was considered a
brother john died of aids. marie howe, who said, "john's living and dying changed my aesthetic entirely." >> the gate. i had no idea that the gate i would step through to finally enter this world would be the space my brother's body made. he was a little taller than me: a young man but grown, himself by then, done at twenty-eight, having folded every sheet, rinsed every glass he would ever rinse under the cold and running water. this is what you have been waiting for, he used to say to me. and i'd say, what? and he'd say, this -- holding up my cheese and mustard sandwich. and i would say, what? and he would say, this, sort of lookinaround. >> production assistance for "inside washington" was provided by allbritton communications and politico, reporting on the legislative, executive, and political arena. it is march madness when it comes to seniors. >> this week on "inside washington," the budget dance continues. >> making sure we can live within our means. >> his poll numbers dropped but the president's charm offensive continues. >> i'm trying to create an atmosphere to get something do
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